Saturday, March 26, 2016

Busy Bee, and good news!


This is really an update on the previous post, and quite a happy one I am glad to say!

I am delighted to be able to report that the shoulder scan that I had a few days ago showed no tears in the rotor cuff area. There is, however, bursitis and the inner workings of the shoulder have got irritated and sore. This was very good news as the tear scenario was not a good one for a potter, and had the potential to have had me move away from clay for a very long time. Bursitis is far more treatable, and I have had a cortisone shot and will have physio. I am still some way off being able to do much with it, but I am pleased to have the prospect of having an arm that is more than a painful ornament!




17 comments:

Michèle Hastings said...

That is great news!

Arkansas Patti said...

Boy am I happy it wasn't a rotor cuff tear. I have one of those and I am still not right after two years. Keep healing Peter and be all better soon. My prayers are with you.

Peter said...

Hi Michèle,
It certainly is, and it is great to be able to look forward to working again.

Hi Patti,
Thank you for your good wishes and prayers, very much appreciated. Sorry that you have had a rotor cuff tear, from what I have read over the last couple of weeks they take a huge amount of time to recover from.

cookingwithgas said...

Great news! On with the show!

mugmkr said...

Excellent news, Peter!

Peter said...

Thanks Meredith and Owen for cheering me on! Good to hear from you both. I'm progressing well, not quite back to clay work yet, but it is good to be thinking happy thoughts about returning to it .. gently.... in the not too distant future!

mikeintonbridge said...

Great news. Bursitis is still a pain in the... well there are bursae in all sorts of interesting places. More chance of getting that inflammation down quickly than waiting for a torn tendon to repair though. (And it usually is the ligamentous/tendon tissue of the joint that goes in the rotator cuff. The shoulder is a notoriously unstable joint. It gives us wonderful freedom - but that is because the only actual joint where your arm is connected to the rest of your skeleton is the tiny joint where your collar bone meets the top of your sternum.) Fascinating what you end up learning when you get side tracked from pottery into studying Thai massage!

I'm a cut and slam wedger myself, and even that isn't without risk.

Peter said...

Hi Mike,
Good to hear from you. It is a pity that you don't live down the road rather than on the other side of the world, I think that your Thai massage skills could be helpful to me! Prior to this injury I had little understanding of how a shoulder was put together (and it is only dimly starting to gel now!) It is interesting how the joint achieves a sort of rotary motion.. I suppose it is the human equivalent of a CV joint on a front wheel drive car!

mikeintonbridge said...

I think that's a really good analogy

Armelle Léon said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Armelle Léon said...

Hello Peter, what a good news, hope you will be better and better

Peter said...

Hi Armelle,
Thank you for that. Progress a bit slow at the moment, so am having to think of other ways to make things. Laura helping quite a bit where she can and it is enjoyable to be able to work together.

Sue said...

Good news Peter.
Sue

Peter said...

Thanks Sue! P

Optimistic Existentialist said...

Glad to hear about the good news on the shoulder scan :)

Anna said...

Bursitis can be slow to recover too :( glad it isn't worse though.. take care and get right soon

Peter said...

Hi Optimistic Existentialist,
Very good to hear from you, welcome to this blog!
Hi Anna,
Thank you for your kind words and for staying in touch. I have been "getting around to" writing a new blog post for the last few days, and definitely hope to put a new post up by the end of this week!